Adam Rice

My life and the world around me

A new job

I’ve been a freelancer since 1989, and in that sense, I get a new job every time a new document comes down the pipe. I am still a freelancer, still doing the same thing, but I still feel like I’ve got a new job.

When I started translating as a freelancer, things were kind of thin. Gradually, my client base and workload picked up, and by 2000, I was making a pretty nice income.

Then came 2001: my income was less than half what it had been in 2000: the Japanese economy–already bad–seemed to get worse, and we all know what happened in the U.S. economy. 2002 was slightly worse; 2003 about the same.

December 2003 and January 2004 were alarmingly quiet, and I could no longer pretend that I was riding out a lean spell and things would pick up in their own time. Either I needed to get more translation work, or I had to get a “real” job (though the idea gave me hives). In the past, I had occasionally made efforts to get new work by cold-calling, but I found the process uniformly unproductive and had given up. Time to try again. I contacted a lot of translation agencies. Most of them thanked me for my resume (if that much) and that was the end of it. Some had me do translation tests. This turned into a more labor-intensive way for me to wind up buried in a rolodex somewhere. But I contacted one company that was different. They sent me a very demanding translation test–a long passage (as trials go) of very challenging material. I slacked a little on finishing it, but eventually did so. And eventually heard back that they like my work and want to add me to their stable. And that they can, it seems, completely saturate my pipeline. And they pay pretty well (especially for Americans). In short, if I choose to, I can pretty much work full-time and exclusively for them. I feel both relieved that a long and difficult period seems to be ending, and anxious that I might screw up.

Jenny and I have discussed before the danger as freelancers of turning one’s client ecology into a monoculture, but right now, it beats the hell out of a xericulture.

5 Comments

  1. Congratulations!

  2. I’m so happy that you didn’t have to resort to the dreaded cubicle thing [SHUDDER].

  3. Congrats Adam!

  4. This was pretty much my situation at Adex, for about ten years. They gave me at least 50%, and often 80% or more, of the work I did–nearly all of it the IEEE journal (magnetic materials, magnetic recording etc).

    When that journal was phased out, I had a rough year or two building up a client base again. I guess that’s what you’ve been through…my sympathies.

    Now, though, one company (but a very large company) is again giving me over half my work, this time patents for filing. I am a bit nervous about it again, but they are excellent about feedback, so that if something goes wrong I should be able to put it right. And they pay well enough, my invoice to them was over $12k last month. (and I did work for others as well)

    Anyways. Hope everything works out well with the new company.

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    THANKS ADAM

    TRUELY

    JACQUELINE GRILLO

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